Reference: Bailis AM and Rothstein R (1990) A defect in mismatch repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulates ectopic recombination between homeologous genes by an excision repair dependent process. Genetics 126(3):535-47

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Abstract


Null mutations in three recombination and DNA repair genes were studied to determine their effects on mitotic recombination between the duplicate AdoMet (S-adenosylmethionine) synthetase genes (SAM1 and SAM2) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SAM1 and SAM2, located on chromosomes XII and IV, respectively, encode functionally equivalent although differentially regulated AdoMet synthetases. These similar but not identical (homeologous) genes are 83% homologous at the nucleotide level and this identity is limited solely to the coding regions of the genes. Single frameshift mutations were introduced into the 5' end of SAM1 and the 3' end of SAM2 by restriction site ablation. The sequences surrounding these mutations differ significantly in their degree of homology to the corresponding area of the other gene. Mitotic ectopic recombination between the mutant sam genes occurs at a rate of 8.4 x 10(-9) in a wild-type genetic background. Gene conversion of the marker within the region of greater sequence homology occurs 20-fold more frequently than conversion of the marker within the region of relative sequence diversity. The relative orientation of the two genes prevents the recovery of translocations. Mitotic recombination between the sam genes is completely dependent on the DNA repair and recombination gene RAD52. A mutation in PMS1, a mismatch repair gene, causes a 4.5-fold increase in the rate of ectopic recombination. RAD1, an excision repair gene, is required to observe this increased rate of ectopic conversion. In addition, RAD1 is involved in modulating the pattern of coconversion during recombination between the homeologous sam genes. These results suggest that interactions between mismatch repair, excision repair and recombinational repair functions are involved in determining the ectopic gene conversion frequency between the sam genes.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Bailis AM, Rothstein R
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