Reference: Tongaonkar P, et al. (1999) Characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and its use as a heat-inducible degradation signal. Anal Biochem 272(2):263-9

Reference Help

Abstract


The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is a highly conserved mechanism of proteolysis in all eukaryotes. Ubiquitin (Ub) is conjugated to proteolytic substrates through the sequential action of ubiquitin-activating (E1/Uba) and ubiquitin-conjugating (E2/Ubc) enzymes. The mechanism of substrate recognition and ubiquitination is an area of active investigation, and we have begun a site-directed mutagenesis approach to define the biochemical and biophysical properties of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. We have characterized a specific mutation in Ubc4 (Ubc4(P62S)) which was previously shown to cause a temperature-sensitive growth defect in several other Ubc's. Ubc4(P62S) was rapidly degraded in vivo, contributing to the loss of function. However, reconstitution experiments revealed that the catalytic activity of Ubc4(P62S) was reversibly inactivated at 37 degrees C, demonstrating that the primary defect of Ubc4(P62S) is its inability to form a ubiquitin thioester bond at high temperature. The in vivo defect is compounded by increased susceptibility of Ubc4(P62S) to degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. We have exploited the temperature-dependent degradation of the P62S mutant to destabilize an otherwise stable test protein (glutathione S-transferase). The use of this mutant may provide a useful cis-acting temperature-inducible degradation signal.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Tongaonkar P, Beck K, Shinde UP, Madura K
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference