Take our Survey

Reference: Liefshitz B, et al. (1995) The role of DNA repair genes in recombination between repeated sequences in yeast. Genetics 140(4):1199-211

Reference Help

Abstract

The presence of repeated sequences in the genome represents a potential source of karyotypic instability. Genetic control of recombination is thus important to preserve the integrity of the genome. To investigate the genetic control of recombination between repeated sequences, we have created a series of isogenic strains in which we could assess the role of genes involved in DNA repair in two types of recombination: direct repeat recombination and ectopic gene conversion. Naturally occurring (Ty elements) and artificially constructed repeats could be compared in the same cell population. We have found that direct repeat recombination and gene conversion have different genetic requirements. The role of the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes, which are involved in recombinational repair, was investigated. Based on the phenotypes of single and double mutants, these genes can be divided into three functional subgroups: one composed of RAD52, a second one composed of RAD51 and RAD54, and a third one that includes the RAD55 and RAD57 genes. Among seven genes involved in excision repair tested, only RAD1 and RAD10 played a role in the types of recombination studied. We did not detect a differential effect of any rad mutation on Ty elements as compared to artificially constructed repeats.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Authors
Liefshitz B, Parket A, Maya R, Kupiec M
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference