Take our Survey

Reference: Gueckel R, et al. (1998) Mutations in the yeast proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3 uncover position-dependent effects on proteasomal peptidase activity and in vivo function. J Biol Chem 273(31):19443-52

Reference Help

Abstract


Proteasomes are highly complex proteases responsible for selective protein degradation in the eukaryotic cell. 26 S proteasomes consist of two regulatory 19 S cap complexes and the 20 S proteasome, which acts as the proteolytic core module. We isolated six mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing mutations in the 20 S proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3. Three mutations (pre3-2, pre3-3, and pre3-5) which reside at the active site cleft of the Pre3 subunit solely caused reduction of the proteasomal peptidylglutamyl peptide-hydrolyzing activity but did not lead to detectable defects in protein degradation nor to any other phenotype. However, the pre3-2 mutation strengthened phenotypes induced by other 20 S proteasomal mutations, indicating that the peptidylglutamyl peptide-hydrolyzing activity has to fulfill some rescue functions. The other three mutations (pre3-1, pre3-4, and pre3-6) are located at diverse sites of the Pre3 protein and caused multiple defects in proteasomal peptide cleaving activities. pre3-1 and pre3-6 mutants exhibited significant defects in proteasomal protein degradation; they accumulated ubiquitinated proteins and stabilized defined substrate proteins as, e.g. fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. In addition, pre3-1 and pre3-6 mutant cells exhibited pleiotropic phenotypes as temperature sensitivity and cell cycle-related effects.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Gueckel R, Enenkel C, Wolf DH, Hilt W
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference