Reference: Finke K, et al. (1996) A second trimeric complex containing homologs of the Sec61p complex functions in protein transport across the ER membrane of S. cerevisiae. EMBO J 15(7):1482-94

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Abstract


Yeast microsomes contain a heptameric Sec complex involved in post-translational protein transport that is composed of a heterotrimeric Sec61p complex and a tetrameric Sec62-Sec63 complex. The trimeric Sec61p complex also exists as a separate entity that probably functions in co-translational protein transport, like its homolog in mammals. We have now discovered in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum membrane a second, structurally related trimeric complex, named Ssh1p complex. It consists of Ssh1p1 (Sec sixty-one homolog 1), a rather distant relative of Sec61p, of Sbh2p, a homolog of the Sbh1p subunit of the Sec61p complex, and of Sss1p, a component common to both trimeric complexes. In contrast to Sec61p, Ssh1p is not essential for cell viability but it is required for normal growth rates. Sbh1p and Sbh2p individually are also not essential, but cells lacking both proteins are impaired in their growth at elevated temperatures and accumulate precursors of secretory proteins; microsomes isolated from these cells also exhibit a reduced rate of post-translational protein transport. Like the Sec61p complex, the Ssh1p complex interacts with membrane-bound ribosomes, but it does not associate with the Sec62-Sec63p complex to form a heptameric Sec complex. We therefore propose that it functions exclusively in the co-translational pathway of protein transport.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Comparative Study
Authors
Finke K, Plath K, Panzner S, Prehn S, Rapoport TA, Hartmann E, Sommer T
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