Take our Survey

Reference: Wilson S, et al. (1999) The role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad32, the Mre11 homologue, and other DNA damage response proteins in non-homologous end joining and telomere length maintenance. Nucleic Acids Res 27(13):2655-61

Reference Help

Abstract


The Schizosaccharomyces pombe homologue of Mre11, Rad32, is required for repair of UV- and ionising radiation-induced DNA damage and meiotic recombination. In this study we have investigated the role of Rad32 and other DNA damage response proteins in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and telomere length maintenance in S.pombe. We show that NHEJ in S.pombe occurs by an error-prone mechanism, in contrast to the accurate repair observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of the rad32 gene results in a modest reduction in NHEJ activity and the remaining repair events that occur are accurate. Mutations in two of the phosphoesterase motifs in Rad32 have no effect on the efficiency or accuracy of end joining, suggesting that the role of Rad32 protein may be to recruit another nuclease(s) for processing during the end joining reaction. We also analysed NHEJ in other DNA damage response mutants and showed that the checkpoint mutant rad3-d and two recombination mutants defective in rhp51 and rhp54 (homologues of S.cerevisiae RAD51 and RAD54, respectively) are not affected. However disruption of rad22, rqh1 and rhp9 / crb2 (homologues of the S.cerevisiae RAD52, SGS1 and RAD9 genes) resulted in increased NHEJ activity. Telomere lengths in the rad32, rhp9 and rqh1 null alleles were reduced to varying extents intermediate between the lengths observed in wild-type and rad3 null cells.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Wilson S, Warr N, Taylor DL, Watts FZ
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference