Reference: Panaretou B and Piper PW (1992) The plasma membrane of yeast acquires a novel heat-shock protein (hsp30) and displays a decline in proton-pumping ATPase levels in response to both heat shock and the entry to stationary phase. Eur J Biochem 206(3):635-40

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Abstract

Recent studies have revealed that the action of the proton-translocating ATPase of the plasma membrane of yeast is an important determinant of several stress tolerances and affects the capacity of cells to synthesise heat shock proteins in response to heat shock [Panaretou, B. & Piper, P. W. (1990) J. Gen. Microbiol. 136, 1763-1770; Coote, P. J., Cole, M. B. & Jones, M. V. (1991) J. Gen. Microbiol. 137, 1701-1708]. This study investigated the changes to the protein composition of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane that result from a heat shock to dividing cultures and the entry to stationary growth caused by carbon source limitation. Plasma membranes were prepared from exponential, heat-shocked and stationary yeast cultures. The proteins of these membrane preparations were then analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot measurement of ATPase levels. The protein composition of plasma membranes displayed two prominent changes in response to both heat shock and the entry to stationary phase: (a) a reduction in the level of the plasma membrane ATPase; and (b) the acquisition of a previously uncharacterised 30 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp30). The ATPase decline with heat shock probably exerts an important influence over the ability of the cell to maintain ATPase activity, and therefore intracellular pH, during extended periods of stress. Through in vivo pulse-labelling of plasma membrane proteins synthesised before and during heat shock, followed by subcellular fractionation, it was shown that hsp30 is the only protein induced by the yeast heat-shock response that substantially copurifies with plasma membranes. It might therefore exert a stress-protective function specifically at this membrane.

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Journal Article
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Panaretou B, Piper PW
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