Reference: Hartwell LH and Smith D (1985) Altered fidelity of mitotic chromosome transmission in cell cycle mutants of S. cerevisiae. Genetics 110(3):381-95

Reference Help

Abstract

Thirteen of 14 temperature-sensitive mutants deficient in successive steps of mitotic chromosome transmission (cdc2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 20) from spindle pole body separation to a late stage of nuclear division exhibited a dramatic increase in the frequency of chromosome loss and/or mitotic recombination when they were grown at their maximum permissive temperatures. The increase in chromosome loss and/or recombination is likely to be due to the deficiency of functional gene product rather than to an aberrant function of the mutant gene product since the mutant alleles are, with one exception, recessive to the wild-type allele for this phenotype. The generality of this result suggests that a delay in almost any stage of chromosome replication or segregation leads to a decrease in the fidelity of mitotic chromosome transmission. In contrast, temperature-sensitive mutants defective in the control step of the cell cycle (cdc28), in cytokinesis (cdc3) or in protein synthesis (ils1) did not exhibit increased recombination or chromosome loss.--Based upon previous results with mutants and DNA-damaging agents in a variety of organisms, we suggest that the induction of mitotic recombination in certain mutants is due to the action of a repair pathway upon nicks or gaps left in the DNA. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the induced recombination is dependent upon the RAD52 gene product, as essential component in the recombinogenic DNA repair pathway. Gene products whose deficiency leads to induced recombination are, therefore, strong candidates for proteins that function in DNA metabolism. Among the mutants that induce recombination are those known to be defective in some aspect of DNA replication (cdc2, 6, 8, 9) as well as some mutants defective in the G2 (cdc13 and 17) and M (cdc5 and 14) phases of the mitotic cycle. We suggest that special aspects of DNA metabolism may be occurring in G2 and M in order to prepare the chromosomes for proper segregation.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Hartwell LH, Smith D
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference