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Reference: Snyder M, et al. (1988) Transcription interferes with elements important for chromosome maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Cell Biol 8(5):2184-94

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Abstract


Transcription directed into a Saccharomyces cerevisiae autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) causes high-frequency loss of minichromosomes. Conditionally stable artificial yeast chromosomes were constructed that contain an inducible GAL promoter upstream of ARS1. Under growth conditions in which the promoter was inactive, these chromosomes were mitotically stable; however, when the GAL promoter was induced, the chromosomes became extremely unstable as a result of transcriptional impairment of ARS function. This interference by the GAL promoter occurred only in cis but can occur from either side of ARS1. Transcriptional interference of ARS function can be monitored readily by using a visual colony-color assay (P. Hieter, C. Mann, M. Snyder, and R.W. Davis, Cell 40:381-392, 1985), which was further developed as a sensitive in vivo assay for sequences which rescue ARS from transcription. DNA fragments from the 3' ends of genes, inserted downstream of the GAL promoter, protected ARS function from transcriptional interference. This assay is expected to be independent of both RNA transcript stability and processing. Philippsen et al. have shown that transcription into a yeast centromere inhibits CEN function in vivo (L. Panzeri, I. Groth-Clausen, J. Shepard, A. Stotz, and P. Philippsen, Chromosomes Today 8:46-58, 1984). We identified two 200- to 300-base-pair DNA fragments flanking CEN4 that rescued ARS1 from transcription. Both of these fragments protected ARS from transcription when inserted in either orientation. The 3' ends of stable transcripts are encoded by fragments that protected the ARS from transcription, suggesting that the protection was achieved by transcription termination. It is suggested that protection of elements important for the replication and segregation of eucaryotic chromosomes from transcription is necessary for their proper function in vivo.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Snyder M, Sapolsky RJ, Davis RW
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