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Reference: Ford CL, et al. (1999) Yeast proteins related to the p40/laminin receptor precursor are required for 20S ribosomal RNA processing and the maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. Cancer Res 59(3):704-10

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Abstract


Numerous studies have linked the overexpression of the Mr 37,000 laminin receptor precursor (37-LRP) to tumor cell growth and proliferation. The role of this protein in carcinogenesis is generally considered in the context of its putative role as a precursor for the Mr 67,000 high-affinity laminin receptor. Recent studies have shown that 37-LRP, also termed p40, is a component of the small ribosomal subunit indicating that it may be a multifunctional protein. The p40/37-LRP protein is highly conserved phylogenetically, and closely related proteins have been identified in species as evolutionarily distant as humans and the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast homologues of p40/37-LRP are encoded by a duplicated pair of genes, RPS0A and RPS0B. The Rps0 proteins are essential components of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Previous results have shown that cells disrupted in either of the RPS0 genes have a reduction in growth rate and reduced amounts of 40S ribosomal subunits relative to wild-type cells. Here, we show that the Rps0 proteins are required for the processing of the 20S rRNA-precursor to mature 18S rRNA, a late step in the maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. Immature subunits that are depleted of Rps0 protein that contain the 20S rRNA precursor are preferentially excluded from polysomes, which indicates that their activity in protein synthesis is dramatically reduced relative to mature 40S ribosomal subunits. These data demonstrate that the assembly of Rps0 proteins into immature 40S subunits and the subsequent processing of 20S rRNA represent critical steps in defining the translational capacity of yeast cells. If the function of these yeast proteins is representative of other members of the p40/37-LRP family of proteins, then the role of these proteins as key components of the protein synthetic machinery should also be considered as a basis for the linkage between the their overexpression and tumor cell growth and proliferation.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Ford CL, Randal-Whitis L, Ellis SR
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