Take our Survey

Reference: Helliwell SB, et al. (1998) TOR2 is part of two related signaling pathways coordinating cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 148(1):99-112

Reference Help

Abstract


The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes TOR1 and TOR2 encode phosphatidylinositol kinase homologs. TOR2 has two essential functions. One function overlaps with TOR1 and mediates protein synthesis and cell cycle progression. The second essential function of TOR2 is unique to TOR2 and mediates the cell-cycle-dependent organization of the actin cytoskeleton. We have isolated temperature-sensitive mutants that are defective for either one or both of the two TOR2 functions. The three classes of mutants were as follows. Class A mutants, lacking only the TOR2-unique function, are defective in actin cytoskeleton organization and arrest within two to three generations as small-budded cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Class B mutants, lacking only the TOR-shared function, and class C mutants, lacking both functions, exhibit a rapid loss of protein synthesis and a G1 arrest within one generation. To define further the two functions of TOR2, we isolated multicopy suppressors that rescue the class A or B mutants. Overexpression of MSS4, PKC1, PLC1, RHO2, ROM2, or SUR1 suppressed the growth defect of a class A mutant. Surprisingly, overexpression of PLC1 and MSS4 also suppressed the growth defect of a class B mutant. These genes encode proteins that are involved in phosphoinositide metabolism and signaling. Thus, the two functions (readouts) of TOR2 appear to involve two related signaling pathways controlling cell growth.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Helliwell SB, Howald I, Barbet N, Hall MN
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference