Reference: Hansen J and Johannesen PF (2000) Cysteine is essential for transcriptional regulation of the sulfur assimilation genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Gen Genet 263(3):535-42

Reference Help

Abstract

Transcription of the genes for sulfur assimilation and methionine biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the size of the intracellular pool of an organic sulfur compound. The identity of this compound is not clear, but suggestions include S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and cysteine. By studying the repression of selected sulfur assimilation (MET) genes, we found that the ability to form cysteine from homocysteine is crucial for methionine-mediated repression to take place. The transcription of MET14 and MET25 could not be repressed by methionine in strains in which either STR4 (which encodes cystathionine beta-synthase) or STR1 (cystathionine gamma-lyase) was disrupted, whereas the repression was independent of GSH1 (which encodes the enzyme responsible for the first step in glutathione biosynthesis from cysteine). In contrast, cysteine could repress the MET genes in all of these strains. Two genes that presumably encode cystathionine gamma-synthase and cystathionine beta-lyase were identified by genetic disruption (ORFs YJR130c and YGL184c), yielding yeast strains that cannot convert cysteine into homocysteine. Repression by cysteine was possible in either disruptant, suggesting a role in repression for cysteine alone. While some repression of MET genes could be accomplished by homocysteine in a strain that cannot form SAM from methionine, a low intracellular level of SAM seems to be necessary for full cysteine-mediated repression to take place.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Hansen J, Johannesen PF
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference