CDC9/YDL164C Summary Help

Standard Name CDC9 1
Systematic Name YDL164C
Alias MMS8 2
Feature Type ORF, Verified
Description DNA ligase found in the nucleus and mitochondria; an essential enzyme that joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication; also acts in ribonucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and recombination, (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and see Summary Paragraph)
Name Description Cell Division Cycle 10
Chromosomal Location
ChrIV:167254 to 164987 | ORF Map | GBrowse
Note: this feature is encoded on the Crick strand.
Gbrowse
Genetic position: -78 cM
Gene Ontology Annotations All CDC9 GO evidence and references
  View Computational GO annotations for CDC9
Molecular Function
Manually curated
Biological Process
Manually curated
Cellular Component
Manually curated
Regulators 6 genes
Resources
Classical genetics
conditional
reduction of function
Large-scale survey
conditional
null
reduction of function
repressible
Resources
64 total interaction(s) for 49 unique genes/features.
Physical Interactions
  • Affinity Capture-MS: 7
  • Affinity Capture-RNA: 1
  • Affinity Capture-Western: 6
  • Biochemical Activity: 1
  • Co-crystal Structure: 1
  • Co-purification: 1
  • Reconstituted Complex: 3
  • Two-hybrid: 5

Genetic Interactions
  • Dosage Growth Defect: 1
  • Dosage Lethality: 1
  • Negative Genetic: 19
  • Phenotypic Enhancement: 2
  • Phenotypic Suppression: 5
  • Positive Genetic: 1
  • Synthetic Growth Defect: 3
  • Synthetic Lethality: 6
  • Synthetic Rescue: 1

Resources
Expression Summary
histogram
Resources
Length (a.a.) 755
Molecular Weight (Da) 84,827
Isoelectric Point (pI) 7.44
Localization
Phosphorylation PhosphoGRID | PhosphoPep Database
Structure
Homologs
sequence information
ChrIV:167254 to 164987 | ORF Map | GBrowse
Note: this feature is encoded on the Crick strand.
SGD ORF map
Genetic position: -78 cM
Last Update Coordinates: 2011-02-03 | Sequence: 1996-07-31
Subfeature details
Relative
Coordinates
Chromosomal
Coordinates
Most Recent Updates
Coordinates Sequence
CDS 1..2268 167254..164987 2011-02-03 1996-07-31
Retrieve sequences
Analyze Sequence
S288C only
S288C vs. other species
S288C vs. other strains
Resources
External Links All Associated Seq | E.C. | Entrez Gene | MIPS | Search all NCBI (Entrez) | UniProtKB
Primary SGDIDS000002323
SUMMARY PARAGRAPH for CDC9

CDC9 encodes DNA ligase (5), an essential enzyme that joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication (11, 7). Cdc9p also acts in nucleotide excision repair and base excision repair (6). Four distinct DNA ligases have been identified in mammalian cells (8, 12); S. cerevisiae Cdc9p is structurally and functionally homologous to mammalian DNA ligase I (8). A second DNA ligase, Dnl4p, has been identified in yeast; it is most similar to mammalian DNA ligase IV(13, 14, 15). Dnl4p cannot substitute for Cdc9p in excision repair (6). The E. coli DNA ligase can complement a cdc9 deletion (16). Like many other genes encoding DNA replication proteins, CDC9 is transcribed during late G1 and S phases of the cell cycle (17). Cell cycle-dependent transcription of CDC9 requires the Swi6p-Mbp1p complex (reviewed in 18, 19).

Last updated: 1999-11-05 Contact SGD

References cited on this page View Complete Literature Guide for CDC9
1) Hartwell LH, et al.  (1973) Genetic Control of the Cell Division Cycle in Yeast: V. Genetic Analysis of cdc Mutants. Genetics 74(2):267-286
2) Prakash L and Prakash S  (1977) Isolation and characterization of MMS-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 86(1):33-55
3) Zou H and Rothstein R  (1997) Holliday junctions accumulate in replication mutants via a RecA homolog-independent mechanism. Cell 90(1):87-96
4) Willer M, et al.  (1999) The yeast CDC9 gene encodes both a nuclear and a mitochondrial form of DNA ligase I. Curr Biol 9(19):1085-94
5) Johnston LH and Nasmyth KA  (1978) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle mutant cdc9 is defective in DNA ligase. Nature 274(5674):891-3
6) Wu X, et al.  (1999) DNA ligation during excision repair in yeast cell-free extracts is specifically catalyzed by the CDC9 gene product. Biochemistry 38(9):2628-35
7) Waga S and Stillman B  (1998) The DNA replication fork in eukaryotic cells. Annu Rev Biochem 67:721-51
8) Lindahl T and Barnes DE  (1992) Mammalian DNA ligases. Annu Rev Biochem 61:251-81
9) Sparks JL, et al.  (2012) RNase H2-initiated ribonucleotide excision repair. Mol Cell 47(6):980-6
10) Hartwell LH, et al.  (1970) Genetic control of the cell-division cycle in yeast. I. Detection of mutants. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 66(2):352-9
11) Johnston LH  (1983) The cdc9 ligase joins completed replicons in baker's yeast. Mol Gen Genet 190(2):315-7
12) Wei YF, et al.  (1995) Molecular cloning and expression of human cDNAs encoding a novel DNA ligase IV and DNA ligase III, an enzyme active in DNA repair and recombination. Mol Cell Biol 15(6):3206-16
13) Ramos W, et al.  (1998) Biochemical and genetic characterization of the DNA ligase encoded by Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YOR005c, a homolog of mammalian DNA ligase IV. Nucleic Acids Res 26(24):5676-83
14) Wilson TE, et al.  (1997) Yeast DNA ligase IV mediates non-homologous DNA end joining. Nature 388(6641):495-8
15) Teo SH and Jackson SP  (1997) Identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA ligase IV: involvement in DNA double-strand break repair. EMBO J 16(15):4788-95
16) Sriskanda V, et al.  (1999) Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli DNA ligase identifies amino acids required for nick-ligation in vitro and for in vivo complementation of the growth of yeast cells deleted for CDC9 and LIG4. Nucleic Acids Res 27(20):3953-63
17) Marini NJ and Reed SI  (1992) Direct induction of G1-specific transcripts following reactivation of the Cdc28 kinase in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Genes Dev 6(4):557-67
18) Koch C and Nasmyth K  (1994) Cell cycle regulated transcription in yeast. Curr Opin Cell Biol 6(3):451-9
19) Breeden L  (1996) Start-specific transcription in yeast. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 208():95-127