ATE1/YGL017W Summary Help

Standard Name ATE1 1
Systematic Name YGL017W
Feature Type ORF, Verified
Description Arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase; catalyzes post-translational conjugation of arginine to the amino termini of acceptor proteins which are then subject to degradation via the N-end rule pathway (2 and see Summary Paragraph)
Name Description Arginyl-tRNA-protein transfErase 1
Gene Product Alias arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase 2
Chromosomal Location
ChrVII:459854 to 461365 | ORF Map | GBrowse
Gbrowse
Genetic position: -12 cM
Gene Ontology Annotations All ATE1 GO evidence and references
  View Computational GO annotations for ATE1
Molecular Function
Manually curated
Biological Process
Manually curated
Cellular Component
High-throughput
Regulators 4 genes
Resources
Classical genetics
overexpression
Large-scale survey
null
overexpression
Resources
15 total interaction(s) for 14 unique genes/features.
Physical Interactions
  • Affinity Capture-MS: 7
  • Affinity Capture-RNA: 1
  • Affinity Capture-Western: 1
  • Reconstituted Complex: 1
  • Two-hybrid: 2

Genetic Interactions
  • Negative Genetic: 3

Resources
Expression Summary
histogram
Resources
Length (a.a.) 503
Molecular Weight (Da) 57,930
Isoelectric Point (pI) 6.26
Localization
Phosphorylation PhosphoGRID | PhosphoPep Database
Structure
Homologs
sequence information
ChrVII:459854 to 461365 | ORF Map | GBrowse
SGD ORF map
Genetic position: -12 cM
Last Update Coordinates: 2011-02-03 | Sequence: 1996-07-31
Subfeature details
Relative
Coordinates
Chromosomal
Coordinates
Most Recent Updates
Coordinates Sequence
CDS 1..1512 459854..461365 2011-02-03 1996-07-31
Retrieve sequences
Analyze Sequence
S288C only
S288C vs. other species
S288C vs. other strains
Resources
External Links All Associated Seq | E.C. | Entrez Gene | Entrez RefSeq Protein | MIPS | Search all NCBI (Entrez) | UniProtKB
Primary SGDIDS000002985
SUMMARY PARAGRAPH for ATE1

ATE1 encodes a cytoplasmic arginyl transferase, responsible for transferring an L-arginyl residue from a tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein (2). Proteins with aspartate or glutamate as their N-terminal residues can act as acceptors for this posttranslational protein modification (3). The transferred arginine acts as a destabilizing residue, subjecting the acceptor protein to the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of the N-end rule pathway (2, 3). Cells that lack Ate1p are viable, but are unable to degrade those substrates of the N-end rule pathway that are usually processed by the arginyl transferase (2). Homologs of the yeast arginyl transferase exist in mouse, human, Arabidopsis, and Drosophila (3).

Last updated: 1999-09-01 Contact SGD

References cited on this page View Complete Literature Guide for ATE1
1) Savage M, et al.  (1983) A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase Curr Genet 7():285-288
2) Balzi E, et al.  (1990) Cloning and functional analysis of the arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase gene ATE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J Biol Chem 265(13):7464-71
3) Kwon YT, et al.  (1999) Alternative splicing results in differential expression, activity, and localization of the two forms of arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase, a component of the N-end rule pathway. Mol Cell Biol 19(1):182-93