New & Noteworthy

SGD Help: Interaction Overview and Network

August 24, 2015


SGD includes data on many thousands of genetic and physical interactions between the genes and proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as curated by our friends at the BioGRID database. We provide two different graphical displays that help you get a very quick and intuitive overview of known interactions for a particular gene or protein.

All interactions for a gene and its product are listed on its interactions page (see an example). At the top of the page, the Interactions Overview shows at a glance how many interactions have been curated and whether they are physical or genetic. This video explains the details of the Interactions Overview diagram:

Farther down on the Interactions page, the Interaction Network is a visual representation of genetic interactions for a particular gene and the protein-protein interactions for its gene product. The network is interactive, allowing you to choose to view either genetic or physical interactions or both. Using the slider, you can set a minimum number of experiments supporting the interactions displayed. Learn how to use the interactive features of the Interaction Network by watching this brief video:

SGD Help Video: Genome Snapshot

August 10, 2015


Have you ever wondered just how many genes are found in the genome of the S. cerevisiae reference strain S288C, or how well characterized they are? SGD’s Genome Snapshot gives you a graphical overview of the annotation state of the genome, updated daily. This brief video gives you a tour of the page and explains the information shown in each section.

SGD Help Videos: Working with Lists in YeastMine

July 28, 2015


Understanding lists and knowing how to work with them is crucial to getting the most out of YeastMine. This set of short videos explains everything you need to know.

YeastMine allows you to save objects in lists. Typically, these objects are genes, but you can also make lists of other objects such as Gene Ontology terms or PubMed IDs. One way to create a list in YeastMine is to run a query and save the results in a list. Another way is to type in or upload your own list.

Whenever you create a list in YeastMine, you’re immediately presented with information about the genes in the list, such as Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment, interactions, orthologs, and more. This can help you decide what kind of further analysis you’d like to do. 

And what if you create a list but then realize that you forgot to include a gene? No worries. It’s easy to edit your saved lists.

Once you have a list of genes, you can feed it into any template query whose name begins with “Gene” to get results for all of the genes in the list. This powerful feature lets you run successive queries to narrow down your results. For example, you could make a list of all the proteins in a given size range, then query that list to see which ones are located in the nucleus, and finally ask how many of these nuclear proteins have human homologs.

And finally, once you’ve created and saved lists you can do a lot of different things with them: combine them, find their intersection, find genes that are not shared between two lists, or find genes that are in one list but not another. This provides a powerful way to combine or compare results from different YeastMine queries.

As always, please contact us if you have any questions about YeastMine. We’re happy to help!

Saving Search Results as a List

Creating and Using Gene Lists

Adding Objects to a Saved List

Feeding Lists into Templates

List Operations

SGD Help Video: Gene Name Reservation

July 13, 2015


The eminent Drosophila geneticist Michael Ashburner famously said: “Biologists would rather share their toothbrush than share a gene name.” It’s true that assigning names to genes is often a sticky subject.

In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae community we’re very lucky to have well-defined guidelines for genetic nomenclature, an established system for reserving gene names, and criteria for making them “standard,” or official, names. This system was agreed upon by yeast researchers nearly two decades ago and has served the community well.

Take a look at this video to get an overview of how the gene naming system works. And as always, please contact us with any questions or suggestions.

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