New & Noteworthy

Call for Yeast Genetics Meeting 2018 Award Nominations!

July 25, 2017


The Yeast Genetics Meeting will be held August 22-26, 2018 at Stanford University. You are invited to submit nominations to the meeting organizers for the awards and presentations that have become a cornerstone of the meeting:
 
The Lifetime Achievement Award is given for lifetime contributions in the field of yeast genetics and outstanding community service.
 
The Ira Herskowitz Award is given for outstanding contributions in the field of yeast research in the last 20 years. This award is usually given to scientists under 50.
 
The Winge-Lindegren Address is a thought-provoking perspective given by a leader in the field of yeast genetics.
 
The Lee Hartwell Lecture is given by a noted researcher in the field who has used yeast in a way that has had an obvious impact on other fields.
 
Previous awardees are listed on last year’s Yeast Genetics Meeting award site.
 
The deadline for nominations is Tuesday, August 1, 2017. Nominations should include: name, affiliation, email address, and a one or two sentence overview of why you are proposing the individual. Please send nominations to mahoney@genetics-gsa.org.

Exploring the Global Yeast Genetic Interaction Network

April 17, 2017


Global yeast genetic interaction profile similarity network. Image from TheCellMap.org.

With the construction of a global genetic interaction network in S. cerevisiae, it’s not hard to see why yeast genetic interactions remain a treasure trove for biological discovery. When combined with tools for visualization and analysis, these data can be used to draw powerful functional maps of the cell and infer potential functions for uncharacterized genes.

In a recent paper published in G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics, Usaj et al. describe a web-based resource for exploring the global yeast genetic interaction network: TheCellMap.org. TheCellMap.org is an online database and visualization tool for quantitative yeast genetic interaction data. It provides an interactive version of the global yeast genetic interaction similarity network described by Costanzo et al., enabling users to scroll through and zoom in on different clusters of functionally related genes within the network. Users can search for specific genes or alleles, extract and re-organize sub-networks for genes of interest, functionally annotate genetic interactions, and more. Further, if more details about a gene are needed, users can even double-click on the gene to be taken to its respective locus summary page at SGD!

For more information about this resource, see http://TheCellMap.org/about/ or access the publication at https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.117.040220.

Apply Now for the 2017 Yeast Genetics & Genomics Course

March 17, 2017


For almost 50 years, the legendary Yeast Genetics & Genomics course has been taught each summer at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

For almost 50 years, the legendary Yeast Genetics & Genomics course has been taught each summer at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. (OK, the name didn’t include “Genomics” in the beginning…). The list of people who have taken the course reads like a Who’s Who of yeast research, including Nobel laureates and many of today’s leading scientists.

The application deadline is April 15th, so don’t miss your chance! Find all the details and application form here.

This year’s instructors – Grant Brown, Maitreya Dunham, and Elçin Ünal – have designed a course (July 25 – August 14) that provides a comprehensive education in all things yeast, from classical genetics through up-to-the-minute genomics. Students will perform and interpret experiments, learning about things like:

  • How to Find and Analyze Yeast Information Using SGD
  • Isolation and Characterization of Mutants
  • Transformation of Plasmids & Integrating DNAs
  • Meiosis & Tetrad Dissection as well as mitotic recombination
  • Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis
  • Next-Gen. whole-genome and multiplexed DNA barcode sequencing
  • Genome-based methods of analysis
  • Visualization of yeast using light and fluorescence microscopy
  • Exploring synthetic biology with CRISPR/CAS9-directed engineering of biosynthetic pathways

Techniques have been summarized in a completely updated course manual, which was recently published by CSHL Press.

legendary plate race

There’s fierce competition between students at CSHL courses in the Plate Race, a relay in which teams carry stacks of 40 Petri dishes (used, of course).

Scientists who aren’t part of large, well-known yeast labs are especially encouraged to apply – for example, professors and instructors who want to incorporate yeast into their undergraduate genetics classrooms; scientists who want to transition from mathematical, computational, or engineering disciplines into bench science; and researchers from small labs or institutions where it would otherwise be difficult to learn the fundamentals of yeast genetics and genomics. Significant stipends (in the 30-50% range of total fees) are available to individuals expressing a need for financial support and who are selected into the course.

Besides its scientific content, the fun and camaraderie at the course is also legendary. In between all the hard work there are late-night chats at the bar and swimming at the beach. There’s a fierce competition between students at the various CSHL courses in the Plate Race, which is a relay in which teams have to carry stacks of 40 Petri dishes (used, of course). There’s also a sailboat trip, a microscopy contest, and a mysterious “Dr. Evil” lab!

The Yeast Genetics & Genomics Course is loads of fun – don’t miss out!

Don’t miss Fungal Pathogen Genomics!

January 30, 2017


The application deadline for the Fungal Pathogen Genomics workshop to be held May 11-17, 2017 at the Wellcome Genome Campus in Hinxton, Cambridge, UK is fast approaching! Be sure to apply by this Friday, February 3!

This exciting new week-long course aims to provide experimental biologists working on fungal organisms with hands-on experience in genomic-scale data analysis; including genome browsers and comparison tools, data mining using resources such as FungiDB, Ensembl/PhytoPathDB, PomBase, SGD/CGD, MycoCosm, analysis of genome annotation, and next generation sequence analysis and visualization (including RNA sequence analysis and variant calling). An important aim is that the participants should understand the origin of data available in public resources and how to analyse it in conjunction with their own.

The course is taught as a collaborative effort between available fungal informatics resources. The majority of this intensive course will be based on hands-on exercises, supplemented by lectures on genomics and bioinformatics techniques and keynote presentations by distinguished guest speakers.

Don’t miss out – apply now!

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