• Cell, actin and nuclear morphology of yeast cells treated with DMSO (left) and poacic acid (right).
    Images courtesy of Hiroki Okada and Yoshikazu Ohya, University of Tokyo.
  • The distribution of mtDNA (green) within the mitochondrial network (red).
    Image courtesy of Christof Osman and Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Natural isolates of S. cerevisiae form complex mats on low-agar media.
    Image courtesy of Elyse A. Hope and Dr. Maitreya J. Dunham, University of Washington
  • slideshow24-new
    Floccule of yeast rho0 cells expressing PTS1-GFP as a peroxisomal marker, stained with calcofluor white.
    Image courtesy of Dr. Jakob Vowinckel, University of Cambridge
  • γ-tubulin and α-tubulin of the mitotic spindle.
    Image courtesy of Nádia Maria Sampaio, Rhesa Ledbetter and Melinda Borrie, Yeast Genetics and Genomics Course, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Colombo S and Martegani E
    Localization of active Ras in a wild type strain
    Image courtesy of S. Colombo and E. Martegani, University Milano Bicocca
  • Sectored Colonies
    Sectored colonies showing loss of silencing at the HML locus
    Image courtesy of Anne Dodson, UC Berkeley
  • Pma1p imaged using the RITE tagging system in mother (green) and daughter cells (red)
    Pma1p imaged using the RITE tagging system in mother (green) and daughter cells (red)
    Image courtesy of Dan Gottschling Ph.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Lipid droplets in fld1 mutant images by CARS
    Lipid droplets in fld1 mutant images by CARS
    Image courtesy of Heimo Wolinski, Ph.D. and Sepp D. Kohlwein, Ph.D., University of Graz, Austria
  • Fpr3p accumulation in the nucleolus of S. cerevisiae
    Fpr3p accumulation in the nucleolus of S. cerevisiae
    Image courtesy of Amy MacQueen, Ph.D., Wesleyan University
    anti-Fpr3 antibody courtesy of Jeremy Thorner, Ph.D., UC Berkeley
  • San1 strain visualized with FUN and calcofluor white
    San1 strain visualized with FUN and calcofluor white
    Image courtesy of the Bruschi lab, ICGEB, Trieste, Italy
  • Single MDN1 mRNAs detected by FISH
    Single MDN1 mRNAs detected by FISH
    Image courtesy of the Zenklusen Lab, Université de Montréal
  • Localization of Ace2-GFP to daughter cell nuclei
    Localization of Ace2-GFP to daughter cell nuclei
    Image courtesy of Eric Weiss, Ph.D. Northwestern University

About SGD

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.

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